Category Archives: buddhism

Meditation to help you see the best in your kids and teens

Negativity Bias and Mindfulness

I was giving a talk recently (I do a few of these online talks to help inform, educate and give you the confidence to start teaching kids/teens meditation) and I came across a term ‘negativity bias‘. 

It means that our brain and body constantly scan the environment for threats. boy_meditating_eyes_closed_mindfullyIf we detect a threat, we manage it as it activates our stress response (fight/flight/freeze) – which is designed to keep us alive.

What it means is that we are hardwired (neurologically speaking) to seek out the negative in our life experiences more easily than the positive ones.

As Rick Hanson, Ph.D., a neuropsychologist and author of “Buddha’s Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom” argues that our brains are like Velcro for negative experiences, and Teflon for positive ones.

I found this fascinating.

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Changing Education with Meditation and Mindfulness

I’m looking to change the education system in order that kids benefit from meditation – every day.

The very fact you are reading this blog suggests that you are interested in…

a/teaching your children meditationchanging education with meditation

b/teaching other people’s children meditation

… and you want this world to be a better place for children in the future when we are ‘not around’ any more.

The growing body of research suggests that there are valid and economic reasons for children and young people to meditate regularly.

Let  me explain.

Reducing the Mental Health Bill

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watch out for mindfulness ‘cowboys’

One of my students Ali Gray, is very passionate about the world learning meditation.  

He is one of our Connected Kids students and together with his colleague, Gary Young, is pioneering a project to make it part of the school curriculum in Scotland.

At a ‘business and mindfulness’ conference, he heard the term mindfulness cowboymindfulness cowboys‘ and wondered what this was about.

He asked me. I sighed.

You see, the term (and subsequent conversation at the conference) suggested that mindfulness was the only type of meditation available.

This is simply not true.

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