Category Archives: research

helping kids and teens with mental health

Mental Health Day

In the UK yesterday there was a mental health awareness day to help us understand and talk about mental health. mental health day and mindfulness

As someone who teaches meditation and mindfulness, this is a key part of the work I do.  It’s why I set up Connected Kids as I have witnessed, many times, how teaching kids, teens and adults meditation helps improve their mental health.

But mental health isn’t the whole picture.  We have emotional and physical health to consider and these are inextricably linked to our mental health. Continue reading

5 Ways Mindfulness Creates Resilience in Children

 

At the moment the world is quite a turbulent place.  If we think our children are too innocent or immune to the stories coming out in the media each day – think again.

Every time we listen to the news on the radio, watch it on TV or surf social media and the internet when our kids are around – they absorb what they hear and see.  Even if they don’t understand it.

So we have a choice.  We can either shield children completely from the world around them (but how do we stop this going on in the playground at school, sometimes in the classroom and at sleepovers?) Or we can help them build their resilience and cope with the ‘bad things and people’ in this world. Continue reading

‘The Whole-Brain Child’ – book review

Book Review – ‘the Whole-Brain Child – Dr Dan Siegel’

Enjoy my review of this fabulous book about child development; how to help them process difficult feelings and thoughts.  Learn why I think it offers some practical tips on how to cope with difficult behaviours. Continue reading

Mandala meditations for kids

I love mandalas.

teaching children meditation with mandalas

www.mandalaproject.org

They are one of the most effective ways to teach children mindfulness skills while they meditate.

The idea behind mandalas in Buddhist practices is to create the mandala out of coloured sand while paying attention to thoughts, body, breath and emotions.  Then when complete,  the mandalas are released to symbolise impermanence and non-attachment.

However we can use paper mandalas just as effectively with young people.

If you find it difficult to get your kids to sit still and meditate in the way you think they should, then you need to change the way you think about meditation.  Mandalas can help you do this.

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Changing Education with Meditation and Mindfulness

I’m looking to change the education system in order that kids benefit from meditation – every day.

The very fact you are reading this blog suggests that you are interested in…

a/teaching your children meditationchanging education with meditation

b/teaching other people’s children meditation

… and you want this world to be a better place for children in the future when we are ‘not around’ any more.

The growing body of research suggests that there are valid and economic reasons for children and young people to meditate regularly.

Let  me explain.

Reducing the Mental Health Bill

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Changing Education with Mindfulness and Meditation

I had an extraordinary trip to the States recently.

It seemed to tie in with how I feel (strongly) about teaching kids and young people meditation.

I am a passionate advocate for meditation becoming a natural part of the school day. It should be introduced into the school curriculum in the same way that we include the sciences and the arts.

When it (eventually) is introduced (hopefully in my lifetime) it will help both the stressed-out teaching staff and the overwhelmed students. Continue reading

Useful resources for teaching kids meditation

So as you can imagine, I live and breathe anything to do with teaching kids meditation, children’s mental health and (teen’s) wellbeing. As a result, I collect a lot of information on this.

If you are on our Facebook page, Twitter or Calm Kids group on FB, then you’ll know that we have become a ‘library’ (so to speak) of useful articles and information, tips and ideas on these subjects).

So I felt it was high time to put many of them in one easy to find place.

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Calm Kids 2 – Research Case Studies – Children with Special Needs – Autism – ADD – ADHD

I am planning a 2nd book which will focus on teaching meditation to children
with special needs and or who have been diagnosed with ADD, ADHD or Autism.

If you would like to take part in the research (there are a limited number of places) Please complete the form below. The information from the case studies will be published (anonymously) in my book.

Application deadline is 28th February 2013.

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Developing Children – autism and aspergers

I just watched a fascinating programme on TV about how our brainsman flying kite develop as children and the potential link with autism.  Many of the issues they mention, such as sensory overload issues, are exactly what I have been talking and writing about for years and I am delighted that this subject is being recognised, discussed and researched.

It will be fascinating to hear how about the results of the research and perhaps how this can influence the diagnosis and teaching of children with autism and how we support them in the world.

 

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How many autistic traits do you have?

I have always been interested in autism – fascinated really on their
perspective and experience of the world and how it may differ to mine.

child head profile silhouette with jigsaw puzzle symbolizing autism spectrum disorders

However as I research a little deeper into this subject I find that there is a myriad of answers to the question – how do you know if a child has autism?

When I first started to look into autism and whether we could teach children with autism meditation, I was amazed to notice the associated behaviours and traits of autism were being displayed by people around me (who weren’t diagnosed as autistic). My husband worked in an office with many guys who were computer ‘geeks’ and I could identify many traits in them that might be seen as autistic (including my husband).
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